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Poems On / About HAIKU  8/23/2014 10:20:17 AM
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Best Poems About / On HAIKU
 
 
 
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  101.     

Haiku magic

haiku
a moment
to treasure

lost in the
universe
counting stars

haiku
sets the mind
into a different gear

breeze
leaves dance
with light

haiku
fresh way to get
the mind awed

looking over city
three children talk about
growing up

haiku
the mind gets a new lane
to explore

chip by chip
new chick cracks
open the world

haiku
a crystal clear tinkle
in the mind

the old brass bell
solid and clear
memory of school years

haiku
a bewitching tug
at the heart

solid faith
devotees pray to
headless buddha

living room solitude
the crashing water from
the silent waterfall

our living room
the Last Supper
never ends

buddhist full moon chant
a fiery saffron
our passion

candlelight dinner
flickering -
our smiles

new tight blossoms
an old woman readies herself
for a walk
 
john tiong chunghoo

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  102.     

Shadow Haiku Noir

the shadow
divided into two
sirens wail


Note:

Here is an excerpt from my Lynx interview with Jane Reichhold

Jane Reichhold: Recently you were working with 'darker themes' in your haiku. Why did you want to do this? And how did it work out for you? Do we need to enlarge the subject matter used in the Japanese genres?

Chen-ou Liu: I've been writing a series of haiku noir on darker themes, such as sudden death, suicide, psychiatric illness, violence, homelessness, alienation, estrangement, racism, rape, …etc. I've had first-hand or second-hand experiences of dealing with most of them (note: a haiku noir is a narrative haiku, i.e. a cinematically dark flash non/fiction in verse) .

I am most influenced by Takuboku's conception of 'poems to eat.' He defined them as 'poems written without putting any distance from actual life, ...and they are not delicacies, or dainty dishes, but food indispensable for us in our daily meal.'

In terms of dealing with one's dark moments, the difference between poets and other people is that poets can convey their feelings through poetry. As Graham Greene stresses, 'writing is a form of therapy; sometimes I wonder how all those, who do not write, compose, or paint can manage to escape the madness, the melancholia, the panic fear, which is inherent in [that] human condition.'

Every time when I put my tangled feelings, stress, or anxiety on paper, I feel relief in the moment. Especially when writing about dark moments, I connect them to the feelings of the past and of the present, and in doing so, it enables me to discover the wholeness of things and the connectedness of human experience. This view of writing about dark moments as a way of healing is well explored in Louise DeSalvo's Writing as a Way of Healing: How Telling Our stories Transforms Our Lives. My review of this book can be accessed at http: //scr.bi/owyOEI.

As for enlarging the subject matter used in English language haiku, I think there is an urgent need to do so. most English language haiku are based on a narrower definition of haiku. Professor Haruo Shirane discusses this in his famous essay, titled 'Beyond the Haiku Moment: Basho, Buson and Modern Haiku Myths: ' 'English-language anthologies of haiku are overwhelmingly set in country or natural settings even though ninety percent of the haiku poets actually live in urban environments. This would seem to discourage haiku poets from writing serious poetry on the immediate urban environment or broader social issues.'

His essay reminds me of Shiki's, titled 'Haiku on Excrement, ' about discovering - or rediscovering - beauty in excrement. In the essay, Shiki demonstrates that the old masters had great capabilities of producing beauty out of ugly material, 'citing 41 poems (most of them haiku) on feces,18 on urine,4 on farts,24 on toilets, and 21 on loincloths.' In the concluding section, he makes clear that he is not particularly fond of writing haiku on excrement; but he mainly uses this topic as an example to show how the poet can explore a wide range of themes (Makoto Ueda, Modern Japanese Poets and the Nature of Literature, pp.29-30)

I identify with Shiki's approach to writing haiku. Most of darker themes in my recent haiku are, directly and indirectly, related to urban life issues that are experienced by all of us and covered by media on a daily basis. For me, they are legitimate subject matters for haiku writing....

Read the full text at, http: //www.ahapoetry.com/ahalynx/272interviews.html
 
Chenou Liu

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  103.     

Basement Haiku Noir

a slant of sunlight
on my basement window sill
the dead fly

Note:

Here is an excerpt from my Lynx interview with Jane Reichhold

Jane Reichhold: Recently you were working with 'darker themes' in your haiku. Why did you want to do this? And how did it work out for you? Do we need to enlarge the subject matter used in the Japanese genres?

Chen-ou Liu: I've been writing a series of haiku noir on darker themes, such as sudden death, suicide, psychiatric illness, violence, homelessness, alienation, estrangement, racism, rape, …etc. I've had first-hand or second-hand experiences of dealing with most of them (note: a haiku noir is a narrative haiku, i.e. a cinematically dark flash non/fiction in verse) .

I am most influenced by Takuboku's conception of 'poems to eat.' He defined them as 'poems written without putting any distance from actual life, ...and they are not delicacies, or dainty dishes, but food indispensable for us in our daily meal.'

In terms of dealing with one's dark moments, the difference between poets and other people is that poets can convey their feelings through poetry. As Graham Greene stresses, 'writing is a form of therapy; sometimes I wonder how all those, who do not write, compose, or paint can manage to escape the madness, the melancholia, the panic fear, which is inherent in [that] human condition.'

Every time when I put my tangled feelings, stress, or anxiety on paper, I feel relief in the moment. Especially when writing about dark moments, I connect them to the feelings of the past and of the present, and in doing so, it enables me to discover the wholeness of things and the connectedness of human experience. This view of writing about dark moments as a way of healing is well explored in Louise DeSalvo's Writing as a Way of Healing: How Telling Our stories Transforms Our Lives. My review of this book can be accessed at http: //scr.bi/owyOEI.

As for enlarging the subject matter used in English language haiku, I think there is an urgent need to do so. most English language haiku are based on a narrower definition of haiku. Professor Haruo Shirane discusses this in his famous essay, titled 'Beyond the Haiku Moment: Basho, Buson and Modern Haiku Myths: ' 'English-language anthologies of haiku are overwhelmingly set in country or natural settings even though ninety percent of the haiku poets actually live in urban environments. This would seem to discourage haiku poets from writing serious poetry on the immediate urban environment or broader social issues.'

His essay reminds me of Shiki's, titled 'Haiku on Excrement, ' about discovering - or rediscovering - beauty in excrement. In the essay, Shiki demonstrates that the old masters had great capabilities of producing beauty out of ugly material, 'citing 41 poems (most of them haiku) on feces,18 on urine,4 on farts,24 on toilets, and 21 on loincloths.' In the concluding section, he makes clear that he is not particularly fond of writing haiku on excrement; but he mainly uses this topic as an example to show how the poet can explore a wide range of themes (Makoto Ueda, Modern Japanese Poets and the Nature of Literature, pp.29-30)

I identify with Shiki's approach to writing haiku. Most of darker themes in my recent haiku are, directly and indirectly, related to urban life issues that are experienced by all of us and covered by media on a daily basis. For me, they are legitimate subject matters for haiku writing....

Read the full text at, http: //www.ahapoetry.com/ahalynx/272interviews.html
 
Chenou Liu

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  104.     

Telugu Haiku

(I intend to introduce Telugu Haiku to members of PH. In Telugu, Hiaku denotes both Haiku and Senryu. While writing Telugu Haiku, poets attached more importance to the expression of thought than the prescribed technicalities like conforming to kigo and writing the verse in present tense etc. Telugu Haiku is a budding literary form and here I endeavour to translate some of the verses of the active Telugu Haiku writers)

(1)
KonEru KaMta
KaluvalatO mustAbu
PriyudevarO

Pond maid
Adorn lotus flowers
Who is lover?

(2)
Ponchi vuntundi
needallE maraNam
jeevaM venukE

Lurks
Death like shadow
Behind life

(Talathoti Prithvi Raj)


(3)
AaTalO
OdipoyAnu
aA pasivAdi navvu chUdAlani

In game
I accede defeat
To see boy’s smile

(B. Venkata Rao)


(4)
Tallulu mugguru
aMduvallE rAmudu
Eka patnE vratudu

Three mothers
So Rama
Embraced one wife

(5)
ArtisTO
ScientistO taruvAta
Mundu nuvvu manishivi kA

Artist or Scientist later
First you become
Human

(6)
Viswa mAnavuDu
Porugu vaadito
nityaM tagAdA

Universal man
With his neighbour
Always quarrel

(Dr. Kasala Nagabhushanam)


(7)
Kalam kAgitam
Kalala nEstAlu
Ivi kalustE kAvyAlu

Pen and paper
Friends of dreams
When they meet….epics

(8)
Raitu kashTam
monnaTidAka yendiMdi
nEDu munigiMdi

peasant’s toil
till day before dried
today drowned

(Duvva Ratnakar)
 
Ch J Satyananda Kumar

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